E-Alert:

All Rome property owners:

 

It's been 3 years since we first heard of the Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation (CAFO) proposed next door in Saratoga.  Efforts by a strong group of Saratoga citizens and some of you have successfully kept it from moving forward.  But, it appears the day of reckoning approaches.  Sources within the DNR indicate the Environmental Impact Report from the organization seeking to build the CAFO is near completion.  The DNR's review has been ongoing and their Environmental Impact Statement is expected early in 2016, possibly February.  Then begins the public review process and public hearing - that time when all your efforts are needed to push back on this proposed CAFO.  This can be done by you attending hearings in person or you can make your feelings known through other means.

 

Tri-Lakes Management and the Rome Town Board are co-sponsoring an informational meeting for Rome property owners on January 16 at 1 pm at the Rome Town Hall.  Note that this meeting is being held on a Saturday to enable attendance for those of you who don't live here full time.  There will be approximately an hour and a half of presentations from a Dr. of water science, a DNR area director, our state assemblyman, town board member, Tri-Lakes and involved citizens.  Questions are encouraged.  As the DNR permitting process moves forward, this may be your last chance to make a difference in your town's future.

 

Come and learn why this issue is so important to the maintenance of Rome's air quality, water purity and water levels in our wells and lakes and our property values.  Please mark your calendars and plan to attend this Informational Meeting on Sat, Jan 16 at 1 pm at the Rome Town Hall.  Please share this with your fellow property owners.

 

 

 

Water QualityWhat harms water quality?

Nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen come from sediments (eroded soil), manure, pet wastes, improperly maintained septic systems, fertilizers, grass clippings and leaves.

 

Phosphorus, whether from natural sources or commercial fertilizers, is plant food.  Too much phosphorus in our lakes causes excessive aquatic plant growth and algae blooms (when lakes turn green).

 

Excess algae can reduce desirable bottom-rooted plants by blocking sunlight.  When algae, plants and other organic materials decay at the bottom of lakes, oxygen is depleted in the water, making it difficult for fish and other aquatic life to survive.  Reduced oxygen levels also contribute to winter fish kills in shallow lakes.

 

Phosphorus provides the fuel algae need to transform lakes into a thick, smelly green soup.  Where it takes 20 parts per million of soil phosphorus to grow healthy turf, 25 parts per billion (a quantity 1,000 times smaller) can promote excessive algae growth in lakes.  One pound of phosphorus can support 500 pounds of algae.

 

Most Wisconsin lawns and soils already contain adequate – and often excessive – amounts of phosphorus.  Although the amount of phosphorus in Wisconsin soils can vary, many residential lawns already have more than enough phosphorus to support a healthy lawn.  Because plants do not absorb more fertilizer than they can use, your lawn does not benefit from phosphorus fertilizer if there is already a sufficient amount of phosphorus in the soil.  Healthy lawns can be maintained with phosphorus-free fertilizers.

 

A healthy lawn needs 20 parts per million (ppm) of phosphorus.  The UW Soils Lab data finds agricultural soils in every Wisconsin county are above 20 (average is 53 ppm).  Recent data estimates phosphorus levels on residential Wisconsin lawns have, on average, twice the amount of phosphorus (105 ppm) than the average farm field; five times more than necessary for healthy lawns.

 

Phosphorus-free fertilizers are available at a comparable cost to phosphorus fertilizers.  (Locally, Ace Hardware and Green’s Garden and Lawn Center carry phosphorus-free fertilizer; additionally Stay-Green Sprinkler Systems is a lawn service that uses it.)  The amount of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potash in a bag of fertilizer is shown by a series of three numbers on the package.  The middle number indicates the amount of phosphorus the fertilizer contains.  Look for the middle number of “0” to be sure you are buying phosphorus-free fertilizer.

 

Others steps you can take to help protect our lakes:

  • Respect the shoreline – no fertilizer or mowing within a 35-foot buffer zone
  • Install barley straw bags under your pier or along your shoreline
  • Use rain barrels, rain gardens and porous materials for driveways, patios and parking areas.  Direct gutter spouts onto your lawn or landscaping (ideally a rain garden), not onto hard surfaces
  • Inspect and pump your septic system on a regular basis (at least once every three years)

 

For additional information, please contact our office at 325-3250

Barb Herreid

 

SHORT REPORT ON WATER QUALITY—FALL 2010           

 
Trophic State

Quality Index

Phosphorus

Chlorophyll a

Sechhi Disk

 

 

 (ug/l)

 (ug/l)

(ft)

 

 

 

 

 

Oligotrophic

Excellent

<1

<1

>19

 

Very Good

1 to 10

1 to 5

8 to 19

Mesotrophic

Good

10 to 30

5 to 10

6 to 8

 

Fair

30 to 50

10 to 15

5 to 6

Eutrophic

Poor

50 to 150

15 to 30

3 to 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below are the averages for the Tri-Lakes for the past four growing seasons.  You can compare them to the table above to see where your lake currently stands.

 

ARROWHEAD

YEAR

PHOSPHORUS

CHLOROPYLL A

SECCHI DISK

 

(micrograms/liter)

(micrograms/liter)

(feet)

2008

19.8

5.5

5.5

2009

23.5

8.8

11.3

2010

27.6

19.5

10.1

 

LOWER CAMELOT

YEAR

PHOSPHORUS

CHLOROPYLL A

SECCHI DISK

 

(micrograms/liter)

(micrograms/liter)

(feet)

2007

32.3

22.8

5.8

2008

40.8

18.5

6.3

2009

25.0

12.6

5.4

2010

27.9

18.0

5.3

 

UPPER CAMELOT

YEAR

PHOSPHORUS

CHLOROPYLL A

SECCHI DISK

 

(micrograms/liter)

(micrograms/liter)

(feet)

2007

28.0

12.9

5.1

2008

30.0

12.0

5.2

2009

22.1

11.2

6.6

2010

21.5

8.0

6.8

 

SHERWOOD

YEAR

PHOSPHORUS

CHLOROPYLL A

SECCHI DISK

 

(micrograms/liter)

(micrograms/liter)

(feet)

2007

48.8

33.5

2.4

2008

34.2

26.5

4.0

2009

35.5

24.3

4.9

2010

33.3

16.8

6.8

 

CITIZEN MONITORING PROGRAM

 

 

The Adams County Land & Water Conservation Department (LWCD) is working with the Tri-Lakes Management District, the Lake Arrowhead Association, the Lake Sherwood Property Owners Association, and the Lake Camelot Property Owners Association to conduct citizen monitoring programs on each of the lakes in the Tri-Lakes area.

 

From 2004-2006, the Adams County LWCD gathered up-to-date information on water quality, aquatic plants, and presence of invasive species (as well as other information) on the Tri-Lakes to assess the current situation on all four lakes.  Since then, LWCD has established groups of citizens on each lake to continue monitoring the lakes.

 

There is no out-of-pocket costs for the citizens&mdash;just their interest and time.  Standard testing costs are paid by Tri-Lakes through a grant from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.  Equipment is provided by the WDNR or the Adams County LWCD.  Reesa Evans, County Lake Specialist, will train and guide the new monitors to get them started.

 

Tests are scheduled once a month from May through September.  Help is also provided by the Tri-Lakes Summer Interns. 

 

If you are interested in helping with this effort on your lake or would like further information, you can contact Barb at the Tri-Lakes Management District office at 715-325-3250 or Reesa Evans at 608-339-4268.

 

Download the above information below:

 

What Affects Water Quality

 

Citizen Monitoring Program

 

2010 Short Report on Water Quality

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 Register for Tri-Lakes E-Alerts

1555 Apache Ave
Nekoosa, WI 54457

715-325-3250